How were Union soldiers treated in Confederate prisons?

Some soldiers fared better in terms of shelter, clothing, rations, and overall treatment by their captors. Others suffered from harsh living conditions, severely cramped living quarters, outbreaks of disease, and sadistic treatment from guards and commandants.

How were Union soldiers treated in Confederate prisons?

Some soldiers fared better in terms of shelter, clothing, rations, and overall treatment by their captors. Others suffered from harsh living conditions, severely cramped living quarters, outbreaks of disease, and sadistic treatment from guards and commandants.

Was there a Union equivalent to Andersonville?

Camp Douglas, in Chicago, Illinois, sometimes described as “The North’s Andersonville,” was one of the largest Union Army prisoner-of-war camps for Confederate soldiers taken prisoner during the American Civil War.

Why did the Union stop exchanging prisoners with the Confederacy?

Asked to review the situation in April 1864, Union General Ulysses S. Grant ordered the halt of all exchanges until the Confederates recognized “the validity of the paroles of the prisoners captured at Vicksburg and Port Hudson,” and stopped discrimination against “colored soldiers.”

What was the worst prisoner of war camp for the South?

But Andersonville was simply the worst of an extremely bad lot. The other Civil War prisons and camps, both North and South, were almost as bad. Of 12,123 Confederates held in the wooden barracks and thin tents of the North’s notorious prison camp at Elmira, N.Y., 2,963, or 24 percent, perished.

Where did Union Keep Confederate prisoners?

Among them were Camp Douglas in Chicago; Camp Butler, near Springfield, Illinois; Camp Morton, former site of the Indiana State Fairgrounds; and Camp Chase. At the same time Union officials designated Johnson’s Island as a prison for Confederate officers.

How were prisoners of war from both the Union and Confederate sides treated?

Prisoners on both sides of the conflict faced similar hazards such as contaminated drinking water, overcrowding, and diseases that passed between prisoners and prison camps. Diarrhea, dysentery, gangrene, scurvy and smallpox were all conditions that plagued prisoners.

How many Confederate soldiers died in Union prisons?

By way of comparison, 13,000, or 29%, of the 45,000 Union soldiers imprisoned at Andersonville died. For the Civil War as a whole, 15.5% of the Union soldiers imprisoned in 28 Southern camps died while in captivity and 12% of the Confederates in 24 Northern camps died.

Was Andersonville a concentration camp?

The Andersonville National Historic Site, located near Andersonville, Georgia, preserves the former Andersonville Prison (also known as Camp Sumter), a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp during the final fourteen months of the American Civil War.

Which famous Civil War prisoner of war camp was in Georgia?

Andersonville
From February 1864 until the end of the American Civil War (1861-65) in April 1865, Andersonville, Georgia, served as the site of a notorious Confederate military prison.

Which POW camp was worst?

The Midnight Massacre is remembered for being “the worst massacre at a POW camp in U.S. history” and represented the largest killing of enemy prisoners in the United States during World War II. A museum was opened at Camp Salina in 2016….

Utah prisoner of war massacre
Injured 19
Perpetrator Clarence V. Bertucci

What happened to Confederate prisoners of war?

Between 1862-1865, approximately 4-6,000 Confederate prisoners died from starvation, disease, and cold at Camp Douglas. Despite the filth, freezing temperatures, inadequate clothing, and disease, however, some Confederates told of being treated humanely.

What did Civil War prisoners eat?

Rations consisted of bacon, beef, coffee, sugar and one loaf of bread each per day. The wooden stockade—700 feet long and 300 feet wide—was smaller than the one at Andersonville. The prisoners were housed in barracks.

How many black soldiers fought for the Union?

By the end of the Civil War, roughly 179,000 black men (10% of the Union Army) served as soldiers in the U.S. Army and another 19,000 served in the Navy. Nearly 40,000 black soldiers died over the course of the war—30,000 of infection or disease.

What was so bad about Andersonville?

It was overcrowded to four times its capacity, with an inadequate water supply, inadequate food and unsanitary conditions. Of the approximately 45,000 Union prisoners held at Camp Sumter during the war, nearly 13,000 died. The chief causes of death were scurvy, diarrhea and dysentery.

Who was the longest serving POW?

Col. Floyd J. Thompson
Col. Floyd J. Thompson, who endured nearly nine years of torture, disease and starvation in Vietnam as the longest-held prisoner of war in American history, has died. He was 69.

What did Civil War soldiers drink?

During the Civil War, a variety of alcoholic beverages were distributed as medicine in the forms of spiritus frumenti (whiskey) and spiritus vini gallici (brandy). Harpers Weekly sketch of soldiers taking a quinine ration. The whiskey was meant to help with the bitterness.

What would happen to the black soldiers if they were caught fighting for the North?

What would happen to the black soldiers if they were caught fighting for the North? What would happen to the white officers of the South caught them? they shall be deemed as inciting servile insurrection and shall be put to death.